Monthly Archives: January 2013

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Your Children Will Be Storing Their Data Like This

Unless you happen to be a molecular scientist, molecular physics just got interesting. Especially to IT representatives in all areas of the business, molecules now hold a very vital key to unlocking ultra-efficient data storage. Soon, data center operators will be able to store insane amounts of data in specialized layers of molecules. It might sound like science fiction, but recently the concept has become fact. It’s called “molecular memory,” and it could mean that within ten years, IT providers will be saving at least 1000TB of memory in a square inch of space. It’s anticipated that the subsequent result will be more energy- and space-efficient data centers worldwide.

The special molecule used in the research, which took place in an MIT lab, was actually first developed in India by chemists at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER). It’s an encouraging prospect that, if nothing else, will progress the discovery of even more real and viable alternatives to traditional data storage systems.

How It’s Done

With the recent leap forward in the technology, researchers have made inroads in specific manufacturing phases that will shave off manufacturing costs as well as produce a product that will be kept cool more easily. This last part will be a selling point to IT personnel who are constantly on the lookout for effective ways to control the heat levels in their data centers.

Molecule Memory Revealed

The secret is manipulating the magnetic conductivity of the special molecule. Each individual molecule takes the place of a binary one or a zero depending on its magnetic state. The end product is store more data in a limited amount of space.

What Tomorrow Holds for “Molecular Memory”

As facility technicians across the globe strive to cut costs and boost performance, this technology is both timely and invaluable. Moodera is hopeful that the results of the research will generate interest in developing more memory solutions.

The team of researchers at MIT was led by Jagadeesh Moodera, who predicts that the end version of the “molecular memory” device will be available on shelves by 2023. Hopefully these systems will ultimately take the place of traditional SSD storage devices worldwide and will dramatically decrease energy usage and waste.

Source: http://www.cio.com/article/727287/New_Molecules_Could_Bring_Super_dense_Solid_state_Hard_Disk_Alternatives